Women break barriers: Dr. Isabelle Scarinci

Women break barriers: Dr.  Isabelle Scarinci

Dr. Isabelle Scarinci is vice chair of the Division of Global and Rural Women’s Health in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. You may have seen her in Rotary Birmingham’s public service announcement about Operation End Cervical Cancer. It’s a statewide initiative to eliminate cervical cancer by 2033. “Cervical cancer is actually the only cancer today that we can say we can eliminate,” Scarinci said. Her story is an example of the power of vaccines. Dr. Scarinci was diagnosed with polio when he was eight months old in a small Brazilian town before polio cases became an epidemic. At the doctor’s request, her mother chose to wait before giving her the second dose of the available vaccine. As a result, the disease spread to her arms and legs. A bout with polio had left her with a noticeable limp, and her mother was wracked with guilt. >> Follow us on social media: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | “I am a living testimony to what vaccination can do,” she said. “That’s why when we talk to parents about vaccinating their children and protecting them from cancer, I hope they can talk to mom and see how difficult it is for her.” With the political ramifications surrounding COVID-19, she said it has been difficult to convince parents to buy the readily available vaccine against Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical cancer and other reproductive system cancers in men and women. Doctors recommend the vaccine for children ages 11 to 12. “Because people now associate the COVID vaccine with other vaccines, such as the HPV vaccine.” “We have 20 years of research. We have millions of children who have been vaccinated,” Scarinci said. “I think it takes a lot of education now for parents to understand the data and see it as safe. It is effective. And he will protect their children. And among immigrants. They often cannot leave work to get additional treatment. “If they lose too many points, they lose their jobs,” she said. Scarinci’s work has taken her to hard-hit areas like Chambers County in rural eastern Alabama and Sri Lanka. >> WVTM 13 ON-THE-GO: Download our app for “We can all do one thing or another,” Scarinci said. “You can vaccinate your kids. If you’re an employer, you can allow your employees to take time off to vaccinate their kids. For Dr. Scarinci, the mission of increasing vaccination rates in Alabama is a personal one. “We’re the ones who drive our husbands or men to the doctor,” she said. “So, there’s “In fact, it’s a bigger opportunity for us to be a role model and to say to the younger generation who might one day be able to ask the question: ‘What is cervical cancer?’

Dr. Isabelle Scarinci is vice chair of the Division of Global and Rural Women’s Health in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. You may have seen her in Rotary Birmingham’s public service announcement about Operation End Cervical Cancer. It is a statewide initiative to eliminate cervical cancer by 2033.

“Cervical cancer is actually the only cancer today that we can say we can eliminate,” Scarinci said.

Her story is an example of the power of vaccines. Dr. Scarinci was diagnosed with polio when he was eight months old in a small Brazilian town before polio cases became an epidemic. At the doctor’s request, her mother chose to wait before giving her the second dose of the available vaccine. As a result, the disease spread to her arms and legs. A bout with polio had left her with a noticeable limp, and her mother felt guilty.

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“I am a living testimony to what vaccination can do,” she said. “That’s why when we talk to parents about vaccinating their children and protecting them from cancer, I hope they can talk to my mother about how difficult it is for her.

With the political fallout surrounding COVID-19, she said it has been difficult to convince parents to buy the readily available vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes cervical and other reproductive system cancers in men and women. Doctors recommend the vaccine for children between 11 and 12 years old.

“Because people now associate the Covid vaccine with other vaccines, such as the HPV vaccination. We have 20 years of research. “We have millions of children who have been vaccinated,” Scarinci said. “I think it takes a lot of education now for parents to understand the data and see that it is safe. That it is effective. And that it will protect their children.”

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Alabama’s cervical cancer rate, the third highest in the country, is further exacerbated by lack of screening and lack of follow-up, especially in low-income areas and among immigrants, Scarinci said. They often cannot stop working for additional treatment.

“In rural Alabama, we have a lot of chicken plants where if they lose too many days of work, they lose points. If they lose too many points, they lose their jobs,” she said.

Scarinci’s work has taken her to hard-hit areas like Chambers County in rural eastern Alabama and Sri Lanka.

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“We can all do one thing or another,” Scarinci said. “You can vaccinate your children. If you are an employer, you can allow your employees to take time off to vaccinate their children.

For Dr. Scarinci, the mission of increasing vaccination rates in Alabama is a personal one.

“As women, we are role models. We are the ones who take our husbands or men to the doctor,” she said. “So, there is actually a greater opportunity for us to be role models and to say to the younger generation who might one day be able to ask the question: What is cancer? I dont know?”

(Tags for translation) Women break barriers (R) Dr. Isabelle Scarinci

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