The northern lights may be visible across Pennsylvania on Thursday night

The northern lights may be visible across Pennsylvania on Thursday night

The Space Weather Prediction Center says in its forecast Wednesday evening that the northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, may be visible across Pennsylvania because a “strong” geomagnetic storm is now likely to occur on Earth starting Thursday evening and continuing into Friday. SWPC says the Sun experienced several coronal mass ejections earlier in the week and is heading toward Earth. According to the SWPC website, ejections are large ejections of plasma and magnetically charged particles. These particles then interact with the Earth’s atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field and form the aurora borealis. The stronger the geomagnetic storm or the more material the Sun sheds, the more the Northern Lights will be seen during the storm. The Space Weather Prediction Center says in its forecast issued Wednesday afternoon that the forecast storm will produce an aurora as far south as Pennsylvania with a peak value of 7 ka. The Space Weather Prediction Center website says the Planetary K index is used to characterize the size of geomagnetic storms. The Kp index ranges from 0 to 9. In order to be able to see the Northern Lights, a Kp index of at least 7 is required. The forecast is for Kp-7 to fall late Thursday. Normally, when it is possible to see the northern lights in Pennsylvania, what we see is a faint colored glow low on the horizon, usually in the northern sky. The northern areas of the Susquehanna Valley have a greater chance of seeing the lights. The best areas to try to see the aurora borealis are in rural areas with very little or no street lights, light pollution, and a clear view of the northern sky, such as on a hill or mountaintop. Stay informed as the Space Weather Prediction Center may update or change its forecasts leading up to a potential geomagnetic storm. The WGAL News 8 Storm Team is calling for mostly clear skies Thursday evening and then high clouds will begin to increase across the area as dawn approaches Friday morning. Read more about the Space Weather Prediction Center here: www.spaceweather.gov.

The Space Weather Prediction Center says in its forecast Wednesday evening that the northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis, may be visible across Pennsylvania because a “strong” geomagnetic storm is now likely to occur on Earth starting Thursday evening and continuing into Friday.

SWPC says the Sun experienced several coronal mass ejections earlier in the week and is heading toward Earth. According to the SWPC website, ejections are large ejections of plasma and magnetically charged particles. These particles then interact with the Earth’s atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field and form the aurora borealis. The stronger the geomagnetic storm or the more material the Sun sheds, the more the Northern Lights will be seen during the storm.

The Space Weather Prediction Center says in its forecast issued Wednesday afternoon that the forecast storm will produce an aurora as far south as Pennsylvania with a peak value of 7 ka. The Space Weather Prediction Center website says the Planetary K index is used to characterize the size of geomagnetic storms. The Kp index ranges from 0 to 9. In order to be able to see the Northern Lights, a Kp index of at least 7 is required. The forecast is for Kp-7 to fall late Thursday. Normally, when it is possible to see the northern lights in Pennsylvania, what we see is a faint colored glow low on the horizon, usually in the northern sky. The northern areas of the Susquehanna Valley have a greater chance of seeing the lights.

The best areas to try to see the Northern Lights are rural areas with little or no street lights, light pollution, and a clear view of the northern sky, such as a hill or mountaintop.

Stay informed as the Space Weather Prediction Center may update or change its forecasts leading up to a potential geomagnetic storm.

The WGAL News 8 Storm Team is calling for mostly clear skies Thursday evening and then high clouds will begin to increase across the area as dawn approaches Friday morning.

Read more about the Space Weather Prediction Center here: www.spaceweather.gov.

(tags for translation) Adams

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