The hiker was stranded on a cliff after following a fake Google Maps trail

The hiker was stranded on a cliff after following a fake Google Maps trail

You might think that Google Maps can’t be completely faulted, but it’s always worth taking it with a pinch of salt.

This doesn’t mean that the service isn’t often very reliable, but sometimes things can really go wrong.

Whether it’s when you arrive at a roundabout and only find out which exit you’re supposed to take when you’re on your third circle, or worse yet, being stranded somewhere far away.

This is what a hiker found while in Canada.

The track has since been removed.  Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue
The track has since been removed. Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue

He was following what he thought was a convenient path in British Columbia which turned out to be completely unreal.

While getting mixed up can be frustrating in the city, in a place like this it can end up being deadly.

And this isn’t a part of the wilderness that’s completely safe either, at least not according to North Shore Rescue, or NSR.

The path was false.  Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue
The path was false. Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue

In a statement posted on Facebook, they said: “To be clear, the area in question has no trails and is very steep with numerous rock bands throughout.

“In previous weeks, NSR had already put up signs in the area warning about this.

“The area is clearly dangerous, as it has been the scene of a previous murder.”

So, it’s basically not a place you want to get lost.

The hiker was trying to reach the summit of Mount Frome, a peak located north of Vancouver.

Unfortunately, while trying, he found himself stuck on the mountainside on November 4 and was unable to return the way he came.

Rescuers were dropped off in a forested area and were able to reach him and take him to safety.

Fortunately, rescuers were able to reach the hiker.  Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue
Fortunately, rescuers were able to reach the hiker. Credit: Facebook/North Shore Rescue

Rescuers reported that the hiker had only minimal equipment, including shoes inappropriate for the trek he was attempting, as well as no flashlight.

The hiker, who has not been named, was not the first person rescuers had to bring back from this location.

In fact, it is the second to be recovered in two months, with rescuers believing both incidents were the result of Google Maps showing a false trail in the area.

In fact there is no such path.

In an update, NSR said that Google Maps has since removed the fake route.

The NSR also advised people to avoid using Google Maps for hiking, and to use specialized apps such as CalTopo or Gaia instead.

Either that, or just an old-fashioned paper map and compass. After all, paper maps don’t run out of battery.

UNILAD has contacted Google for comment.

(tags for translation) News

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