Earth is bracing for two solar storms from today, which have a 75% chance of causing blackouts – and a physicist tells the Daily Mail what you can expect to see in the coming days

Earth is bracing for two solar storms from today, which have a 75% chance of causing blackouts – and a physicist tells the Daily Mail what you can expect to see in the coming days

The Sun released two powerful streams of energetic particles this week, which have a 75% chance of causing a radio blackout when they hit Earth.

A physicist told DailyMail.com that solar storms are expected on Tuesday and Wednesday, with some effects felt on Thursday, but the storm comes after a storm on Monday that knocked out communications over the Pacific Ocean.

Dr. Tamitha Skov said Sunday’s flare was “the largest we’ve seen in weeks” and had already caused short-lived radio outages over Australia and the Asia-Pacific region.

“NOAA gives us a 75 percent chance of M-class flares (radio outages that cause flares) over the next three days while (two sunspots) are still in view of Earth,” Skov said.

“In addition to HF (high frequency) radio warnings, GPS users are advised to remain vigilant, especially in the hours near dawn and dusk because reception of GPS/GNSS (other global navigation satellite systems) signals can easily deteriorate At those times when flares are active.

Dr. Tamitha Skov said that the torch that was launched on Sunday was

Dr. Tamitha Skov said Sunday’s flare was “the largest we’ve seen in weeks” and had already caused a short radio blackout over Australia and the Asia-Pacific region.

The two active sunspots, 3559 and 3561, fired coronal mass ejections (CMEs) just one day apart, the first on Sunday.

A coronal ejection could eject billions of tons of coronal material from the surface of the Sun. Matter consists of plasma and magnetic fields.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) uses a five-level system, called the S scale, to indicate the severity of a solar radiation storm.

The agency shows a 15 percent probability of such storms occurring from today until Thursday.

Data showed that the flare from 3559 had already disrupted radio communications over the South Pacific, Fiji and the northeastern coast of Australia.

Dr Tamitha Skov told DailyMail.com:

Dr Tamitha Skov told DailyMail.com: “NOAA gives us a 75% chance of an M-class flare over the next three days while the sunspots are still visible.”

SWPC shows a G1 storm warning in effect through Thursday.  This is a small storm that could weaken the power grid's fluctuations and affect satellite operations

SWPC shows a G1 storm warning in effect through Thursday. This is a small storm that could weaken the power grid’s fluctuations and affect satellite operations

The two active sunspots, 3559 and 3561 (pictured flare), fired coronal mass ejections (CMEs) just one day apart

The two active sunspots, 3559 and 3561 (pictured flare), fired coronal mass ejections (CMEs) just one day apart

“The storm, which launched on the 21st, is expected to hit today, and it already looks like it will be a quick hit as well (this time to Earth’s south),” said Skov, who hosts space weather forecasts on YouTube.

I say this because neutron monitors (ground-based detectors that measure particles from space) indicate that there is a major solar storm near Earth right now.

We might still get a side pass from its side (or edge) later today, but NASA’s Space Weather Analysis Office’s Moon to Mars (M2M) forecast for this scenario shows only active conditions, which means we won’t even get a G1 storm. Levels.

SWPC shows a G1 storm warning in effect through Thursday.

This is a small storm that could weaken the power grid’s fluctuations and affect satellite operations.

Skov explained that the flare from 3559 was the largest seen in weeks, and had already disrupted radio communications over the South Pacific, Fiji, and the northeastern coast of Australia.
Pictured is 3559 on the Sun

Skov explained that the flare from 3559 was the largest seen in weeks, and had already disrupted radio communications over the South Pacific, Fiji, and the northeastern coast of Australia.

Skov explained that the second flare of 3561 was
In photo 3561 on the sun

Skov explained that the second flare of 3561 (pictured) was “the most visually stunning solar storm ever shot yesterday” and had an Earth-directed component.

Migratory animals are affected at this level and higher levels; The aurora borealis are commonly visible at high latitudes (northern Michigan and Maine), SWPC shared on its website.

The second flare of 3561 was “the most visually stunning solar storm ever shot yesterday,” Skov explained, and contains an Earth-directed component.

That region released an M4.3 flare, which is classified as medium in size and causes short radio interruptions that affect the Earth’s polar regions.

However, Skov noted that this led to some minor problems for high-frequency radio communications near the equator and areas of South America.

“While the NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) model is running, early forecasts call for it to arrive on the afternoon of January 25 at 9 a.m. ET, but forecasts also indicate it may move more slowly.

“In this case, it could happen in the early morning of January 26 at 1 a.m. ET.

“NOAA SWPC has adjusted the storm watch at G1 level between now and January 26.”

(Tags for translation) Daily Mail

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