Apple Vision Pro users say they’re being tortured by curious onlookers when they wear the $3,500 augmented reality device on the street… with bizarre videos emerging of them using it

Apple Vision Pro users say they’re being tortured by curious onlookers when they wear the $3,500 augmented reality device on the street… with bizarre videos emerging of them using it

  • The Apple Vision Pro was released in the US on February 2
  • Users say they are stared at by passersby or bombarded with questions about the device
  • Videos have emerged showing the technology being used on the subway or even behind the wheel



Apple Vision Pro users say they get stared at by curious onlookers when they wear the $3,500 gadget in public.

Early users of the augmented reality device shared bizarre videos of themselves typing on invisible keyboards and even exercising while driving.

Apple Vision Pro is a “spatial computer that blends digital content and apps into your physical space, letting you navigate using your eyes, hands, and voice,” according to its manufacturer.

In simple terms, it lets you enjoy the features of virtual reality while allowing you to see the world around you.

The technology was launched in the US on February 2, and Apple sold out pre-orders on January 19, selling 200,000 devices. It has already made waves, but not all attention has been positive.

Users have reported being criticized for covering their faces and being stared at by bystanders who don’t realize they can be seen, with others saying they are often asked to try out the expensive device – much to their disdain.

Apple Vision Pro users say curious onlookers stare at them when they wear the $3,500 gadget in public
Nikias Molina turned heads when he decided to use an augmented reality device to write while on the subway. He showed a view of what he could see while wearing the device
Dante Lentini stunned social media users when he uploaded a video of himself using the device while behind the wheel of his Tesla Model Y in Autopilot mode.

Nikias Molina traveled from Barcelona to New York to purchase a device and filmed himself typing on an invisible keyboard, much to the astonishment of other subway users.

On his return trip to Spain, he was bombarded with questions from the person sitting next to him who asked to try it.

“I don’t want to be involved,” the 25-year-old YouTuber told the Wall Street Journal, adding that the flight attendant had been watching him the entire time.

“I thought I couldn’t see her,” Molina said. “People are just curious.”

Dante Lentini also stunned social media users when he strapped in his Vision Pro and jumped into a Tesla Model Y on Autopilot.

A video clip showed him hitting and tapping on the air while his car drove itself.

He described the experiment as “futuristic”, but online commenters expressed concern about the safety of using both at the same time.

A community note in the post on X also provided links to guidelines on not using the device while driving.

Ben Barr, an entrepreneur and technology investor, says dozens of people have approached him and asked to wear the device.

Apple Pro users say they’re often bombarded with questions from people keen to try out the devices for themselves

TikTok has been flooded with videos of Vision Pro users recording funny demonstrations of using the device in the wild or being mocked for their unusual behavior.
Apple Vision Pro was released in the US on February 2, and is described as a “spatial computer that blends digital content and apps into your physical space, letting you navigate using your eyes, hands and voice.”

“They definitely have fun when they see the screen and they can see everyone around them,” he told the Wall Street Journal. “In general, I’ll just let my friends do it moving forward.”

Meanwhile, TikTok is full of videos of Vision Pro users recording funny looks for using the device in the wild or being mocked for their unusual appearance.

Amit Gupta, a Southwest Airlines passenger, received thousands of likes for his review of the technology during a five-hour flight.

However, some users have filmed themselves walking around cafes wearing the device without receiving any reaction at all.

The Vision Pro has a single, thick band at the back of the head, connecting a large, sleek screen that sits above the eyes.

In his review, Matthew Phelan, chief science correspondent at DailyMail.com, said he felt “silly” using the device until he “remembered there were dozens of other people milling around”.

If technology spreads, the world will undoubtedly develop its own views on what constitutes acceptable etiquette.

VIsion Pro gives users the option to adjust the level of immersive experience, fading in or out of physical reality and the digital experience with something similar to cross-fade in film.

Apple sold out pre-orders on January 19, selling 200,000 devices before the official launch
Users can adjust the level of immersive experience, fading in or out of the physical and digital experience

For new father Anshil Saj, 34, the device provides some welcome entertainment while his one-month-old daughter falls asleep on his chest.

However, he has put an end to its use while his partner is present, considering it too “isolated”.

But his wife, Talia Sage, 30, told the Wall Street Journal she didn’t mind.

“We don’t always have the same taste in shows,” she said. “This would be a nice way to spend some time together while he can watch whatever he wants.”

(tags for translation)Apple

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