A whale was found dead off New England tangled in a fishing line in Maine

A whale was found dead off New England tangled in a fishing line in Maine

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says a North Atlantic right whale was found dead near Martha’s Vineyard on Jan. 28, with a Maine fishing line tangled and secured to its tail. , including purple markings, the rope corresponds to the rope used on water trap/bowl buoy lines in Maine. A full necropsy report on the whale, registered as North Atlantic Right Whale No. 5120, was still pending Wednesday, but preliminary findings reported on February 2 found chronic entanglement, with a rope deeply embedded in the tail and a tender body condition. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said an autopsy showed no evidence of blunt force trauma. This right whale, Squilla’s only known calf (number 3720), was born during the 2021 calving season. This same whale has been added as a critical injury case to the ongoing case. An unusual death of a North Atlantic right whale occurred on August 31, 2022, after the first sighting of a dangerous entanglement. North Atlantic right whales are close to extinction, with approximately 360 individuals remaining, including fewer than 70 reproductively active females. Announcement of tethering of North Atlantic right whales The tether found in Maine comes a day after a coalition of environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the federal government, hoping to force new rules limiting the speed of ships off the East Coast to be finalized. Environmental groups submitted to the Federal Court on Tuesday a request to allow the lawsuit over ship speed rules to be temporarily halted to go ahead. Members of these groups have criticized the federal government for its delay in issuing the final rules, and said they hope to force a deadline through their lawsuit. “The can is on the road,” said Jane Davenport, senior staff attorney for Defenders of Wildlife, one of the groups involved in the lawsuit. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the proposed ship speed rules in the summer of 2022. The rules would expand slow zones off the East Coast that require sailors to slow down. It will also require more ships to comply with these rules.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says a North Atlantic right whale was found dead near Martha’s Vineyard on Jan. 28, with a Maine fishing line tangled and secured to its tail.

NOAA’s Fisheries Service announced Wednesday that based on its analysis of the gear, including purple markings, the rope is consistent with rope used on water trap/bowl buoy lines in Maine.

Rope from a dead whale designed to be from Maine

A full necropsy report on the whale, registered as North Atlantic Right Whale No. 5120, was still pending Wednesday, but preliminary findings reported on February 2 found chronic entanglement, with a rope deeply embedded in the tail and a tender body condition. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said an autopsy showed no evidence of blunt force trauma.

This right whale, Squilla’s only known calf (number 3720), was born during the 2021 calving season.

This same whale was added as a critically injured case to the ongoing North Atlantic Right Whale Unusual Mortality Event on August 31, 2022, after the first sighting of a serious entanglement.

A North Atlantic right whale tangled in a fishing line

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/Michael Moore

North Atlantic right whales are close to extinction, with only about 360 individuals remaining, including fewer than 70 actively reproductive females.

The announcement of the tether found in Maine comes a day after a coalition of environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the federal government, hoping to force new rules limiting the speed of ships off the East Coast to be finalized.

Environmental groups submitted to the Federal Court on Tuesday a request to allow a temporarily stalled lawsuit over ship speed rules to proceed. Members of the groups criticized the federal government for its delay in issuing the final rules and said they hoped to force a deadline through their lawsuit.

“The federal government has known for years that right whales urgently need expanded ship protections, but has repeatedly ignored it,” said Jane Davenport, a senior staff attorney at Defenders of Wildlife, one of the groups involved in the lawsuit.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced proposed ship speed rules in the summer of 2022. The rules would expand slow zones off the East Coast that require mariners to slow down. It will also require more ships to comply with these rules.

(tags for translation) Maine Fishing Gear

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