A new study shows that taking a twice-daily dose of cinnamon can prevent diabetes in people at risk

A new study shows that taking a twice-daily dose of cinnamon can prevent diabetes in people at risk

A study suggests that adding a dose of cinnamon twice daily to your diet can help prevent diabetes in people at risk of developing the disease.

Researchers at UCLA found that eating roughly a teaspoon of the sweet spice can significantly reduce blood sugar levels in people with prediabetes — potentially preventing full-blown diabetes.

In prediabetes, blood sugar is high above healthy levels, but not high enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes.

Chronically high blood sugar — which results from the body’s inability to convert sugar into energy — can lead to a number of potentially fatal complications, including heart disease and serious infections.

Scientists recruited 18 overweight or obese adults who were diagnosed with prediabetes.

The participants were put on a “big” diet – rich in simple carbohydrates such as white bread and pasta, but devoid of vegetables – for a month.

The polyphenols in cinnamon have been linked to lower blood sugar, including a new study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The polyphenols in cinnamon have been linked to lower blood sugar, including a new study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

They were divided into two groups: half of them took a placebo capsule twice a day, and the other group took a capsule containing a teaspoon of cinnamon.

They found that those who took the supplements had “significantly lower” blood sugar levels and smaller glucose peaks than those who took a placebo.

The researchers found that cinnamon significantly reduced blood sugar levels in overweight or obese adults and those with prediabetes.

The researchers found that cinnamon significantly reduced blood sugar levels in overweight or obese adults and those with prediabetes.

“Cinnamon, a widely available and low-cost dietary supplement, may contribute to improved glucose control when added to the diet in people with obesity-related diabetes,” the researchers wrote.

However, researchers not involved in the study cautioned that larger trials are still needed.

“While the study population was selected to explore the effects of cinnamon on glucose regulation in individuals with prediabetes and obesity, applying it to a broader population requires caution.

“The small sample size limits the strength of the conclusions and reflects the need for larger, more representative studies.”

In the study published last month in the In the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers evaluated 18 overweight or obese adults for 12 weeks. This means they have a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 40.

The average body mass index was 31.5, which is considered obesity. All participants were diagnosed with prediabetes but were otherwise healthy.

During the first two weeks of the study, participants were placed on a diet low in polyphenols, which are compounds found in fruits and plant-based vegetables such as berries and dark leafy greens.

This was considered a “beige diet” filled with refined carbohydrates such as white bread and pasta instead of fruits and vegetables. They were also asked to avoid cinnamon during this phase.

Then the patients were divided into two groups. Each group was given 16 seemingly identical capsules each day. Eight of them were meant to be eaten with breakfast, and eight of them were meant for dinner.

The treatment group received capsules each containing four grams of cinnamon, roughly three-quarters of a teaspoon. Meanwhile, placebo participants were given supplements containing 250 milligrams of maltodextrin, a processing additive that has been shown to cause a spike in blood sugar.

Both groups took their assigned pills for four weeks and then did a two-week “washout” phase, where they took no capsules. They then switched groups for the rest of the study.

The researchers monitored the participants’ blood sugar levels using continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which are attached to the user’s arm with an adhesive and use a small needle just under the skin.

Participants gave blood samples four times throughout the study to measure how their bodies responded to sugar — after the two-week introductory diet, after the four-week first supplementation phase, after the four-week washout phase, and after the four-week second supplementation phase.

The researchers found that overall glucose levels “were consistently and significantly lower in the cinnamon treatment compared to placebo.”

Those who took cinnamon also had lower blood sugar than those who took a placebo.

However, there was no difference in glucose levels shown in blood tests. The researchers suggested that this may be because continuous monitoring is more sensitive to blood sugar changes.

The chart above shows estimates of diabetes cases globally.  The number of people with this condition is expected to double by 2050 compared to 2021.

The chart above shows estimates of diabetes cases globally. The number of people with this condition is expected to double by 2050 compared to 2021.

Ms Costa said cinnamon could lower glucose levels due to its high levels of polyphenols and compounds such as cinnamaldehyde and antioxidants.

“These natural compounds enhance insulin’s ability to communicate with cells, prompting them to take up glucose more effectively,” she said.

“They also reduce harmful inflammation and support the liver in storing excess glucose as glycogen to meet future energy needs.”

The researchers also suggested that cinnamon could encourage the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut microbiome, which may affect glucose levels.

The team pointed out that the study has limitations, which are the small sample size. “The small number of participants included in the study may not be representative of all individuals with prediabetes and obesity,” they wrote.

“However, the relatively small sample size provides sufficient statistical power to detect a significant difference between the cinnamon and placebo interventions in approximately 700 repeated days of observations.”

This is not the first time scientists have found a possible link between cinnamon and low blood sugar.

For example, a 2020 study in the Journal of the Endocrine Society found that taking cinnamon supplements with a meal reduced the likelihood of developing diabetes after three months.

A recent study conducted by experts at Diabetes Strong found that Delaware residents are at the highest risk of developing type 2 diabetes

A recent study conducted by experts at Diabetes Strong found that Delaware residents are at the highest risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Our World in Data, using figures from the International Diabetes Federation, ranked Pakistan as the country with the highest rates of diabetes in the world.  Meanwhile, the United States and the United Kingdom ranked 59th and 136th, respectively

Our World in Data, using figures from the International Diabetes Federation, ranked Pakistan as the country with the highest rates of diabetes in the world. Meanwhile, the United States and the United Kingdom ranked 59th and 136th, respectively

Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas no longer has enough beta cells, which make insulin. Insulin regulates blood sugar, also known as glucose, which the body needs for energy.

When the body cannot produce enough insulin, too much blood sugar remains in the bloodstream. This can lead to heart disease, kidney disease, nerve damage and other permanent health problems.

In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune reaction causes the body to destroy beta cells and thus stop producing insulin.

Meanwhile, type 2 diabetes develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults. This occurs when insulin in the body is unable to maintain blood sugar at normal levels.

Obesity is a major risk factor for this form, which affects more than 90 percent of people with diabetes.

Experts estimate that the explosion in type 2 diabetes cases – more than double the current number of 529 million – will be driven largely by the world’s expanding waist circumferences.

For example, a study published last year in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that obesity is associated with 30 to 53 percent of new type 2 diabetes cases in the United States annually.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that four in 10 Americans are obese, and the rate is rising. Between March 2020 and March 2021, for example, the number rose by 3 percent.

Dietary factors can play a role in the onset of type 2 diabetes, as the American diet is high in sugar and processed foods — known risks for the condition.

Benefits of cinnamon

Once traded as a currency, cinnamon is now a popular and widely available household spice.

The bark is peeled off and placed in the sun to dry, where it is rolled into coils known as cinnamon sticks. Cinnamon is also available in powder form.

Cinnamon thrives in tropical regions, where the main variety is Ceylon cinnamon from the Cinnamomum zeylanicum plant, which comes from Sri Lanka.

The other main type is Cassia cinnamon, which has a stronger taste and is a bit cheaper. Most commercial cinnamon is a mixture of the two.

Cinnamon is believed to have many medicinal and soothing properties, and is frequently used in Chinese herbal medicine.

Cinnamon’s distinctive aroma and flavor come from an essential oil found in the bark called cinnamaldehyde.

Cinnamaldehyde displays antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal properties.

Cinnamon also contains large amounts of plant antioxidants that help protect the body from diseases. It is found in fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices.

It has been found that the antioxidants in cinnamon have anti-inflammatory effects.

Cinnamon extract has been used to relieve digestive problems in Eastern and Western medicine for years.

In Ayurvedic medicine, cinnamon bark oil is used to treat flatulence and digestive imbalance.

The warmth of cinnamon is thought to increase blood flow and improve blood oxygen levels to help fight disease.

Previous research has also indicated that cinnamon reduces blood pressure and relieves digestive discomfort.

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